Friday, July 26, 2013

Friday Favorites - DC Romance Cover Swipes!

Greetings, readers! Here at Sequential Crush, we've witnessed Charlton swipe DC, but how about DC borrowing from their own past artist efforts? Today I have for you five sets of covers that range from being pretty much exact reproductions, to the strikingly similar. Since most of these "swiped" covers on these particular issues do not contain the same stories as their original predecessors, do these covers point to a busy schedule? Lack of inspiration? Or just the norm in comic book publishing? Though it is hard to pinpoint the exact reason for these cover similarities, they sure are a pleasure to look at. These ten covers are just the tip of the iceberg concerning this phenomena in the world of DC romance comics -- part two, anyone?!


 Young Love #94
(April 1972)


 Girls' Romances #56
(November 1958)

 Heart Throbs #139
(March 1972)



 Girls' Love Stories #172
(August 1972)



Falling in Love #130
(March 1972)


 Young Romance #184
(July 1972)

Young Romance #189
(December 1972)


Have a fantastic weekend!

Credits: 1.) Girls' Romances #96 (November 1963) Pencils: John Romita 2.) Young Love #94 (April 1972) 3.) Girls' Romances #56 (November 1958) Pencils: Bernard Sachs 4.) Heart Throbs #139 (March 1972) 5.) Falling in Love #92 (July 1967) Pencils: Jay Scott Pike 6.)  Girls' Love Stories #172 (August 1972) Pencils and Inks: Jay Scott Pike 7.) Girls' Love Stories #82 (November 1961) Pencils: John Romita 8.) Falling in Love #130 (March 1972) 9.) Young Romance #184 (July 1972) Pencils: Art Saaf 10.) Young Romance #189 (December 1972) Pencils: Jay Scott Pike

12 comments:

  1. Those are fun examples. The two Young Romance covers are especially striking: same magazine, same year, even same yellow background!

    Here's a few more examples I found, courtesy of our old friend the Grand Comics Database: Girls' Romances 60 and Heart Throbs 143; and Girls' Love Stories issues 46 and 169.

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    1. Thanks, David! I too was struck by the last example. The two issues are probably the least similar, but TOO similar not to go unnoticed! Definitely lots more to explore, so I'm sure there'll be a part two :)

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  2. More homage than swipe, imo. The artists from the 60's did the nature backgrounds with more detail, or maybe Girl's Love 82 is just really detailed. Awesome finds.

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    1. Could be an homage -- didn't think of it like that. I just wish we had some further evidence to back up either theory!

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  3. These are fantastic -- I love them. Inspirational? Sure, but lazy too. On the first, the artist thought, "Ah, Hell, let's keep the same birch tree . . . I'm tired and wanna go home." Number 2- hootenanny vs hipster -- pretty lazy work. But the last three illustrate a need to modernize an old idea, so some homage for sure. Bookscans also show copied pulp covers, so in the biz of illustration, time constraints must have often trumped creativity. Anyway, regardless of the the reasons -- its fun -- variations on a theme.

    Wes

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    1. I'm curious to know if any readers saw the later versions and bought them just because they remembered the original! Slim chance maybe, but who knows?

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  4. Anybody else notice that all the ones that copied older issues are from 1972?

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    1. I did Diana. I can't quite put my finger on why that year...

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  5. A fun study in comparative style - excellent!

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  6. Not s familiar with romance comics as I am with other genres, but I suspected swipes were fairly common. Thanks for sharing.

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