Saturday, February 14, 2015

Happy Valentine's Day from Sequential Crush - Thoughts on Romance, Comics, and True Love

"One More Summer"
Pencils: Mike Sekowsky, Inks: Bernard Sachs
Secret Hearts #115 (October 1966)

Happy Valentine's Day! I know the day is nearing an end and evening has crept in, but I just wanted to drop in and say hello. I hope you enjoyed your day with your loved ones -- whether they be friends, family, or a significant other, and that more than anything, you felt the love today.

To tell you the truth, I've always had a really tough time conceptualizing Valentine's Day posts, and this year, the sixth Valentine's Day since I started Sequential Crush, is no exception. I always feel this immense pressure to do something a-m-a-z-i-n-g to commemorate the romantic holiday, and always feel like a let down. I don't know. Maybe I need a mentor who writes a Christmas blog and see how they structure their December 25th post! Seriously though, I felt so much anxiety over posting something earth-shattering for the holiday this year, that part of me was like, meh! Nevermind!

But, something made me change my mind. I started thinking about love and what it means to me in my own life. The past couple of weeks have been quite a bit more stressful than usual for yours truly. I'm in the middle of moving. As I write this, I am actually sitting in my old house, surrounded by the broom, mop, and other assorted cleaning supplies I'm supposed to be using right now. After enjoying my own little living and workspace for two years now, I'm moving to a house with my handsome, loving, generous, and supportive boyfriend. I feel awesome about this move and our future, but because of the move (which is a stressor I think many of you can identify with), coupled with unfulfilling day jobs, and never enough time together because we are working said jobs, I've been a little down. These are the stresses in life that make us lose focus on what's really important -- love.

The thing I love about romance comics is that they give me hope. Despite their beautiful hair, stunning clothes, and perfectly proportioned bodies (well, usually -- sometimes those Charlton comics can be a little iffy), the romance comic book characters are imperfect. Flawed men and women with neuroses, hangups, and vulnerabilities. Romance comics get a ton of flack for being unrealistic and outdated, but for the most part -- they are entertaining, and in many ways, comforting. Though many of the romance stories are problematic from a modern view when it comes to gender issues and diversity, overall, the romance comics of the '60s and '70s are full of identifiable situations, characters, and stories. Love is not perfect. Love is messy. Love is damn hard sometimes. But, as the romance comics so beautifully demonstrate with their breathtaking finale kisses, it is so undoubtedly worth it.

So tonight, if you are feeling low on hope, crack open a romance comic or flip through past posts here at Sequential Crush. I think you'll find that the stories will give you comfort that everything will end Happily Ever After.


Happy Valentine's Day!

♥♥♥

7 comments:

  1. VEry thoughtful post. I enjoy your site. Wish I had a little boyfriend love right now (I'm a widow). Do you have any comics about widows? Also how did you think up your cool title Sequential Crush?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for visiting, LoveAlice! Here are two other stories about widows: http://sequentialcrush.blogspot.com/search/label/Widows

      Usually, stories of widows in the romance comics seem to be tied to them being young, single mothers.

      I'm so glad you like the title! When I was starting the blog I just took a piece of paper and made two columns. One was for comic book related terms, and the other, for love synonyms. After a bunch of attempts at various combinations, Sequential Crush was born!

      Delete
  2. Just clicked on The Mansion of Forbidden Love and found a widow's story!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for this thoughtful post, Jacque. Although I'm a relatively new reader of romance comics, I've loved classic Hollywood romance movies for a few decades now, for the same reasons you cite. One can look at them cynically, mock their air of unreality, etc. But I think it's more useful to view them and the emotions they contain as something to aspire to--to remember in my own relationship that if both of us are willing to work hard, we can overcome the obstacles that come our way. Romance movies, and comics, give us hope--and what is life without hope? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well said, David! I can definitely see corollaries between classic Hollywood romances and the romance comics. It seems the romance comics (and comics in general) were certainly influenced by the movies!

      Delete
  4. Thanks for that post, Jacque. I'm not going through a move or anything, but I have had some stressful stuff going on in the past few weeks, so what you said really hits home.
    Anyway, I wish you the best with the move and, well, life in general.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Edo! You take care as well. Let's beat this stress!!!

      Delete